Need to find the write word for an emotion? Pun intended.

Often used as a tool for therapists, emotion wheels can help find just the right word to describe a feeling. You start in the middle and work your way outward. Originally introduced by Robert Plutchik, emotion wheels have evolved depending on need. Great tool for writers! Below is one example but you can google “emotion wheel” to find other examples.

Emotion Wheel by Onesimusix https://imgur.com/a/CkxQC

 

Quick Link: Storyboarding with Scrivener (or, A Love Affair with Virtual Index Cards)

Quick links, bringing you great articles on writing from all over the web.

Do you use Scrivener? I have it and I use it sporadically but sporadic is my middle name. It is a great tool for organizing but it can be a bit overwhelming.  from Writers UnBoxed has some great tips with lots of pictures on how to use the index card feature of Scrivener better.

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Storyboarding with Scrivener (or, A Love Affair with Virtual Index Cards)

By

Whether you’re a plotter or a pantser—or neither—at some point in your writing process, you can probably benefit from a visual overview of your story. Scrivener’s Corkboard feature is here to help.

Pack up your paper index cards and colored sticky notes, and let’s go virtual.

Understanding Index Cards in Scrivener

Every file in Scrivener has an associated index card. That index card shows up in the Synopsis section of the Inspector (visible in all but the Snapshots and Comments panes), and on the Corkboard. You can use the index card to make note of anything you want—for example, the timeline, setting, characters—but for storyboarding purposes, it makes sense to include a brief synopsis of the scene.

Read the full post on Writers UnBoxed

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Quick Link: KINDLE SCOUT –STEP INSIDE FOR A TOUR

Quick links, bringing you great articles on writing from all over the web.

Have you tried using Kindle Scout for one of your titles? What did you think? I love it as a reader. (Because we all know I haven’t finished anything yet.) If you haven’t heard of Kindle Scout, or you wanted to learn more Debbie Burke from Kill Zone has an excellent article on the process. Check it out!

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KINDLE SCOUT –STEP INSIDE FOR A TOUR

By Debbie Burke

Kindle Scout is Amazon’s innovative program where readers “scout” for new books and vote for ones they believe should be published. Back in April, I covered the basics of Scout for TKZ. Since then, I submitted my thriller Instrument of the Devil and went through my own 30-day campaign. Today, let’s open the Scout door and take a tour inside.

SUBMISSION PROCESS:
To submit to Scout, Amazon requires a cover (at author’s expense), a complete, never-before-published, edited manuscript of 50+K words, a 45-character one-liner (logline), a 500-character book description, author bio, and a thank-you note to readers who nominated the book (more on this later).

After Scout accepts the submission, they select the dates for the 30-day campaign, and provide a link that shows the preview exactly as it will appear on the Scout site. The first 25 or so pages of the book are excerpted as a sample for readers to vote on.

Read the full post on Kill Zone

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Women’s fashions through history

Need some inspiration for how women dressed throughout history? User at Imgur has a fantastic graphic of women’s fashion in every year from 1784-1970.

Quick Links: Google Maps: The Best Writing Tool that No One Knows About

Quick links, bringing you great articles on writing from all over the web.

I love Google maps. I have an exercise program that uses them and it is so much fun, but I do admit I never thought of it as a writing tool.  At Writer Unboxed, Camille Di Maio shows how wrong I am and how you too can use Google maps to boost your writing. Just don’t blame me for the lost time spent browsing!

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Google Maps: The Best Writing Tool that No One Knows About

Has a map ever challenged a pre-conceived notion that you had about a location? Please welcome Camille Di Maio to WU today, who’ll talk about the topic. A bit about Camille:

Camille Di Maio always dreamed of being a writer, and those dreams came true with her bestselling debut novel, The Memory of Us. In addition to writing women’s fiction, she trains in tae kwon do, buys too many baked goods at farmers’ markets, unashamedly belts out Broadway show tunes, and regularly faces her fear of flying to indulge in her passion for travel. She and her husband homeschool their four children and run an award-winning real estate office in San Antonio, Texas. They divide their time between San Antonio and Williamsburg, Virginia. Her second novel, Before the Rain Falls, is out now.

Learn more on Camille’s website, and by following her on Facebook and Twitter.

The Best Writing Tool that No One Knows About

You know that feeling. Some people call it déjà vu. That feeling that you’ve been there before.

And you have. Kind of.

I experienced a unique sense of this in 2016 when I first traveled to Liverpool, UK. It was the setting for my first novel, THE MEMORY OF US, a story inspired by the classic Beatles song, Eleanor Rigby. While writing and researching, I desperately wanted to visit Liverpool. To wander its streets. View its architecture. Feel its history. But what was a working mom of four kiddos in Texas supposed to do?

Enter Google Maps. The best writing tool that no one knows about. Well, of course, you know about Google Maps. But do you use it in your writing?

Read the full post on Writer Unboxed

Quick Link: How to Write a (Romance) Blurb by Rosalind James

Quick links, bringing you great articles on writing from all over the web.

Your book blurb is one of the best tools you have in marketing your book. You have gotten the potential reader interested enough to come look a little more at your title. This is where you can make a big impact on sales. While Rosalind James is writing specifically about Romance blurbs, the tips she provides at Romance University works for everyone. Also, as someone that prepares an ebook newsletter please please please start your blurb with a two to three sentence paragraph the captures the essence of your book. Then go deeper. Not only are you helping people like me who want to present your book in the best light possible, but you also give a good description for people who like your story to tell their friends. It puts you in control of your marketing message!

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How to Write a (Romance) Blurb by Rosalind James

by Rosalind James

Welcome Rosalind James in her first blog post for RU – and it’s a doozy! =)

As some folks know, I spent my misguided youth—all right, all right, my misguided middle age—as a copywriter. Which means that writing blurbs for my books was a piece of cake, right?

Wrong. I had to learn how to do it, because writing one type of copy isn’t the same as writing another. But maybe it was a little easier and less scary to learn. So, OK, here are my tips for Writing Your Kickass Romance Blurb.

Look at other blurbs. (You thought this was going to be some technical post, huh?) I learned to do it by going to the library and pulling down books in my genre from the paperback rack. Somehow, it was much easier to spot trends and pick out blurbs I liked from physical books. I read and took notes for an hour. I noticed what I hated as well as what I liked. Which blurbs made ME want to read the book? Because I write the kinds of books that I like to read. After I did my research, I came home, and . . .

Read the full post on Romance University

Quick Link: Are You Clear About Your Writer Persona? Going Public by Design

Quick links, bringing you great articles on writing from all over the web.

Privacy is such an important, and often under reported, issue these days. It is so easy to find out information on someone. But as authors, we want people to know about us, and that means sharing something of who we are.  At Jane Freidman,

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Are You Clear About Your Writer Persona? Going Public by Design

Quick Link: How to Set Up an eBook Ad with Amazon Marketing Services

Quick links, bringing you great articles on writing from all over the web.

Did you know you can set up ads for your ebook with Amazon Marketing Services? I didn’t. But at Indies Unlimited,

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How to Set Up an eBook Ad with Amazon Marketing Services

Amazon Marketing Services Logo 2017by

A few months ago, KDP opened up Amazon Marketing Services to all eBooks, not just the ones in Kindle Unlimited. Setting up an ad is a relatively simple process, although it can look intimidating in the beginning.

Today, I’m going to walk you through how to set up both types of advertising.

First, go to your Reports page in KDP and click on Ad Campaigns (red arrow below).

Amazon KDP Reports-dashboard
Click to enlarge

You’ll be taken to a screen that gives you the option of creating a new campaign (red arrow below).

New advertising campaignClick “New campaign,” and you’ll be taken to a screen to choose whether to do a Sponsored Products ad, or a Product Display ad (see red arrow below).

Read the full post on Indies Unlimited

Quick Link: A plea for reviewers – can we open up a dialogue about self-published books?

Quick links, bringing you great articles on writing from all over the web.

Roz Morris, owner of Nail Your Novel, reaches out to people who review books with a plea that they open their minds a little towards reviewing self-publishing titles. I can understand the reluctance of book reviewers, there are a lot of self-published books that look, well, self-published.  A lot. But, there are also a lot of self-publishing authors who do it right by hiring the correct people so their title is a professional offering and they are growing.  Thoughts?

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A plea for reviewers – can we open up a dialogue about self-published books?

by Roz Morris

So I find a lovely-looking review blog. The posts are thoughtful, fair and seriously considered. I look up the review policy and … it says ‘no self-published books’.

Today I want to open a dialogue with reviewers. If you have that policy, might you be persuaded to change it? Or to approach the problem in a different way?

I used the word ‘problem’. Because I appreciate – very well – that in making this policy you are trying to tackle a major problem. Your time as a reviewer is precious – and let me say your efforts are enormously appreciated by readers and authors alike. You get pitches for many more books than you can read and you need a way to fillet out the ones that are seriously worth your reading hours. A blanket ban is a way to fend off a lot of substandard material and save you many unpleasant conversations. And traditional publishing implies a certain benchmark of competence.

Competence. That’s probably the heart of the matter. There are good self-published books, of course, but how can I help you sort them from the bad and the fug-ugly?

Read the full post on Nail Your Novel

Quick Link: How I Wrote Two Full-Length Novels in 18 Months

Quick links, bringing you great articles on writing from all over the web.

Over at Lifehacker Nicole Dieker, who is obviously not a pantser, shares how she was able to successfully write two novels in 18 months.  She has some great tips for you to check out and see if anything is useful to you.

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How I Wrote Two Full-Length Novels in 18 Months

Quick Link: Should You Start a Video Blog?

Quick links, bringing you great articles on writing from all over the web.

Bless Laura Drake for being braver than me! She decided to start a video blog and posted her experiences and why you should start a vlog. She even included her first one at Writers In The Storm for you to check out!

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Should You Start a Video Blog?

 

I’ve read so much about how video blogs are the next big thing. I swore I’d never do that. I mean, come on. I’m old, I’m fluffy, I don’t think well on my feet, don’t know anything about the tech involved, and I say ‘anyway’ all the time.  Oh, and I’d have to do my hair and makeup. Other than that, sign me up!

But then a few things happened. I read that in January 2016 Facebook announced there are more than eight billion video views and more than 100 million hours of video watched on the platform daily.

That’s an amazing stat, but it doesn’t negate even one of my arguments above.

Then I ran across this video:

Oh my God. I’ll bet I’ve watched that 9 times by now, and she has almost a million hits on it (more, after today, I’ll warrant). Do I judge her for being goofy? Hell no. She’s badass.

Dammit, this woman just negated all my arguments.

I eased into this the same way I convinced myself to write my first book – I’d write the book, get it out of my system, then hit delete!  NO one would ever have to see it. Boom.

Quick Links: Looking for a Book Editor? Here’s How Much You Should Expect to Pay

Quick links, bringing you great articles on writing from all over the web.

If you have never hired a book editor and are curious at how much they cost or want to compare what you have paid, then read on for Blake Atwood’s post at The Write Life. Be warned, you might want to gird your loins for sticker shock. But while these services don’t come cheap they are often necessary to produce a quality (and sellable) book.

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Looking for a Book Editor? Here’s How Much You Should Expect to Pay

I wish I could tell you that proofreading will always cost one cent per word, copyediting two cents per word, and developmental editing three cents per word, but the truth is much hazier than that.

While I will provide hard numbers, you should first know certain essentials about hiring an editor.

This information may help you understand why editing costs seem to vary widely from one editor to the next, but it should also assist you in comparing possible editors.

How much you can expect to pay an editor depends on at least eight variables:

1. What kind of editing are you seeking?

Developmental editing (aka content editing, big picture, or macro editing) costs more than copyediting (aka micro editing), and copyediting costs more than proofreading.

2. What’s your total word count?

Editors charge by word count or page count. Some may charge by the hour, but that’s rare, especially for editing long books.

Knowing your total word count is essential to an editor’s cost estimations for taking on your project.

3. How complex is your book?

Editing academic work to a niche style guide will cost more than editing a novel per the Chicago Manual of Style.

Editing a book with hundreds of footnotes or endnotes should cost more than editing a book without citations.

Quick Links: Staying Organized While You Write–and Finish–Your Book

Quick links, bringing you great articles on writing from all over the web.

What tools do you write with? I use both MS word with track changes on and Scrivener.  At How To Plan, Write, And Develop A Book, owner Mary Carroll Moore gives her professional advice on how she stays organized while writing.

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Staying Organized While You Write–and Finish–Your Book

By Mary Carroll Moore

No matter where you are in the book-writing journey, at some point the sheer volume of material begins to overwhelm and it’s time to look carefully at how to organize yourself.

A private client recently wrote me about this.  She’s been trying to locate some “islands” (snippets of writing, or scenes) that she’d written a while back, but she couldn’t remember how she’d titled them.  They were virtually lost in the mass of material on her computer.

She asked:  “I’d appreciate your advice on how to save my islands on Word.  Should I title them? Date them? How will I handle revisions? As separate documents or just edits of the original?  Confusion reigns on this front!  Also, in your book (Your Book Starts Here), you mention saving work in files.  What are these exactly and how do I create them?”

I work in both Scrivener and Word.  I find Scrivener easiest for organizing, but I do end up using Word quite a lot for final drafts before submitting.  Here are the methods I use in each, plus some low-tech organization tools learned along the way.

Favorite Tools for Organizing Your Book-in-Progress

Quick Link:How to Start Your Own Publishing Company

Quick links, bringing you great articles on writing from all over the web.

Not every indie writer needs to become a publisher, but there are a lot of advantages even if the only books you publish are your own. But it is always nice to give back and if you have figured out how to self-publish, there are a lot of people out there who could use your help. In that spirit, Writer Unboxed‘s

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How to Start Your Own Publishing Company

Over the past few months, we’ve talked about what it means to be an ‘indie’ author and why some writers choose this path. Today we’ll discuss how to turn your writing into a business by starting your own publishing company. While today’s publishing platforms don’t require you to start a business in order to publish your work, doing so offers many advantages—maximizing tax write-offs, controlling and protecting your work, shielding your personal assets in the event of a lawsuit, conveying professionalism, and, of course, the pride of running your own business.

Indie Navigator founder Mary Shafer believes that starting a publishing company can create plenty of value for self-publishing authors, whether you’re about to publish your first book or you’ve been at this for a while. “Creating a publishing company does two main things: it establishes you as a serious indie publisher who may or may not handle the work of other authors, rather than simply a self-published author. It sends the message that you take the business end of publishing seriously, even if you only publish your own work. Second, it gives your products a professional quality that makes them a lot more attractive to book buyers, librarians, and other parties who may be interested in buying or licensing rights to your work. Plus, it makes your company a lot more attractive to buyers should you ever decide to retire. ‘Sun City Press’ is a lot more impressive-sounding and easy to market as an imprint than ‘Joe Schmoe Books.’”

Quick Link: Schedule Your Time in 4 Simple Steps

Quick links, bringing you great articles on writing from all over the web.

Trying to find more time in the day seems to be every adult’s desire. I don’t know if I could follow Janalyn Voigt schedule personally, but I thought it was very well written and that there are some of you out there that would like more structure in your day. So head on over to the newly redesigned  Live Write Breath website, and let us all know of any time scheduling tips you have. For me, as my kids are older, I have a pair of noise cancelling headphones. Everyone knows when they are on, I am not to be disturbed unless there is fire, flood, or blood.

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Schedule Your Time in 4 Simple Steps

The divide between what you want and your actual lifestyle is never more apparent than at the beginning of the year. There’s something about turning that calendar with a fresh new outlook that gives all of us a boost toward attaining our dream lives. That’s why we devise New Year’s resolutions to lose weight, exercise, and you name it. The writing version of that can look like a push to increase the number of novels you write this year or simply to finish the first one.

You start with the best of intentions every new day but time escapes you, distractions waltz by, or you rebel against your own schedule. Overcommitting your time is a common mistake. I know about this firsthand, let me tell you. It’s no fun to stay up past your bedtime when you want to sleep in order to meet a deadline.