When Writers Struggle with Social Media Commitment Issues

New social media platforms are coming out all the time.  It helps if you understand which platform is best for you to reach your audience, but how do you make social media outreach less of a chore?

When Writers Struggle with Social Media Commitment Issues

by Edie Melson

We all know it’s important for writers to have a solid presence online.

But many of us struggle with Social Media commitment issues. We have good intentions, but our follow-through may be less than stellar.

So today I’d like to share some tips to help you stay on track.

Stay Committed to Social Media

  1. Set Reasonable Expectations.I think this is the most important piece of advice I can give you. When I first started blogging, I wanted to excel at it. So my inclination was to set the bar high, posting at least five times a week. But the more I thought about it, the more I realized I might not be able to keep up. So instead I started slow, posting once a week, and only adding more days to my schedule when I knew I could handle it. It has been the smartest thing I’ve ever done. I’ve managed all my social media this way, and I believe it’s the one thing that has contributed the most to my success.

Read the full post at The Write Conversation

Quick Link: Sometimes You Have to Break the Rules on Social Media

Quick links, bringing you great articles on writing from all over the web.

I admit it, this post freaked me out. Committing to social media pushes my buttons and I need a lot of baby steps to get there.  On the niche site Social Media Just For Writers, guru Frances Caballo shares what she has found to be helpful in dealing

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Sometimes You Have to Break the Rules on Social Media

By

In the past, I’ve recommended strict rules about social media use.

Don’t argue politics. Stick to neutral topics. Be aware of your readers’ differing opinions.

Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah.

I’ve not only broken my own rules, I’ve shattered them. Yes, you heard me correctly.

You see, during the worst fire in California’s history, which occurred in my community, a lot changed around here.

For one, the way I kept in touch with the majority of friends during this time was through Facebook.

How could I, in the face of many friends’ tremendous losses, post empty quotes and information about my blog posts? It wouldn’t have made any sense.

So I got down and dirty, so to speak.

By

Read the full post on Writers and Authors!

Quick Link: Adjusting your Vision: Linking Author Identity and Author Brand

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Clay Gilbert posting at Writers And Authors has some great thoughts on how to improve your brand. This is especially good reading for new authors trying to get established, although more experienced authors will find some good information they just might have missed.

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Adjusting your Vision: Linking Author Identity and Author Brand

by Clay Gilbert

When my first novel was published in 2013, all I knew was that I wanted to tell stories for a living.  I’d grown up seeing Stephen King, Ray Bradbury and Anne Rice do it, and, having gotten paid $25 for the publication of a short story in Scholastic magazine when I was still in middle school, I’d had a little taste of doing it myself.  But I had the idea that what my readers were most interested in was the story I was telling, and that they didn’t really care about ‘the man behind the curtain.’

In today’s literary world, that kind of thinking is wrong.

Readers today are inundated with choices and competition for their attention, and for their money.  If you’re a new author today, taking your first steps into the publishing marketplace, you’re competing not only with thousands of already-established authors, many of whom have best-selling reputations, but also with word-of-mouth and Internet buzz about other new writers as well.

Read the full post on Writers And Authors!

Quick Link: Social Media Content Tips for Authors – What to Post

Quick links, bringing you great articles on writing from all over the web.

I don’t know how someone who has such a busy life that there is no extra time can also have such a boring life! One of the reasons I am bad at social media is I don’t like my pictures and I have no idea what to say to keep up my end of the deal.  Thank goodness Bookworks has this post from Frances Caballo Social Media Expert that will get me started. Hopefully, it has some good info for you too! What is your best content tips?

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Social Media Content Tips for Authors – What to Post

by Frances Caballo Social Media Expert

Many people are confused about what they should say in their social media posts. Figuring out successful social media content strategies can be challenging and there is no one-size-fits-all.

Authors often ask me, “If I can’t always post about my own books, what am I supposed to say?” 

You may remember the 80/20 rule: 80 percent of the time, you promote your colleagues, other writers, and great posts, and 10 percent of the time, you can promote your books, readings, and awards.

If you’re still feeling confused about how to best present the information you’ve curated, don’t worry. Just keep reading and you’ll learn how to write the best social media updates.

The Freedom of Just 140 Characters

 

Read the full post on  Bookworks!

Quick Link: 14 Facebook Live Ideas for Authors

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So you know how I always talk about baby steps. Well doing a Facebook Live event is too much of a big step for me, but if you are braver than I am or further along in your journey then Rachelle Gardner at Books & Such has some great ideas for you!

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14 Facebook Live Ideas for Authors

Blogger: Rachelle GardnerIf you’ve done any Facebook Live posts and paid attention to your traffic, you probably already have a good idea of how much more engagement you can get with FB Live versus other kinds of posts. This is especially true if you experiment with various kinds of content, times of day, length, and other variables.

We highly recommend our authors start doing FB Lives, and shoot for about once a week if possible. It seems to work best if you follow a few guidelines (from Facebook Media):

  • Let people know ahead of time what time you’ll be live.
  • Before you go live, write a compelling invitation and description. (When you click “Start a live video,” you’ll be taken to a page where you can enter your description where it says, “Say something about this video.”)
  • Try to speak to your commenters by name while you’re live.

 

Read the full post on Books & Such

Quick Link: How Pinterest Can Help Writers Write Better

Quick links, bringing you great articles on writing from all over the web.

I love Pinterest. It is a great place for inspiration and help. Just be warned, it is very addictive and very easy to lose a lot of time there. At Live Write Thrive, guest poster Piers Golden shares how Pinterest can help you as a writer. Oh and I am paula1849 on Pinterest and I would love to hear from you!

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How Pinterest Can Help Writers Write Better

Today’s guest post is by Piers Golden.

As you are contemplating writing a book, the thought of using Pinterest as a tool may not occur to you until after the book is complete.

While Pinterest is a great marketing tool for authors, you may be surprised to find that there are many ways that Pinterest can improve your writing, depending on the type of book that you are writing.

Let’s take a look at these.

Plotting and Planning

All books require research. You may be confident in your subject matter, but if you are going to get the details just right, you will need to make sure that you have the right information when you are describing locations, actions, and secondary characters.

This may seem like a minor issue, but these are the types of details that can throw a reader out of the story. As you are beginning the research portion of your novel, you may find Pinterest useful.

Read the full post on Live Write Thrive!

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Quick Link: The Do’s and Don’ts of Naming Characters

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This is so cool I had to share it! At well-storied, Kristen Kieffer hosts a Twitter chat group that discusses all kind of things writing. This particular example is about naming characters and she has a transcript because we can’t build a time machine and go back and attend. Yet.

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The Do’s and Don’ts of Naming Characters

by Kristen Kieffer

Hello, friends! Time for another #StorySocial recap. Never heard of it?

#StorySocial is the weekly chat I host every Wednesday at 9pm Eastern on Twitter. Each week, dozens of writers get together for about an hour to chat about a fun writerly topic. This past Wednesday, we talked all about how to name our characters.

Did you miss out? Couldn’t make it? No worries. I’m sharing a recap of this week’s chat below. Check it out!

Read the full post on well-storied!

Quick Link: What’s More Important: Author Websites or Social Media?

Quick links, bringing you great articles on writing from all over the web.

At

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What’s More Important: Author Websites or Social Media?

In 2013, I observed a conversation on Twitter where a publisher said they didn’t believe in author websites “for a lot of authors”—that social was a better place for authors to spend time from a marketing perspective.

It bothered me, and I ended up writing a blog post about it, exploring why a publisher might think this—rightly or wrongly.

Since then, I’ve taught countless conference sessions and webinars about author platform development, content strategy, marketing and promotion, and long-term best business practices. Hands down, the No. 1 thing I’m questioned about is social media—by the unpublished writers, advanced writers, and well-established career authors. I don’t mind fielding such questions, but I find social media the most difficult topic to teach effectively, and I’ll have a separate post about that tomorrow.

On the flip side, I rarely field questions about author websites, aside from technical ones about what service to use or other fiddly details related to domains, hosting, and WordPress sites. I believe this happens for a few reasons: Website design and development is a more technical area, plus few authors actively engage on their site with readers. It can be something of a “set it and forget it” thing. Who’s really looking at an author website that much anyway, especially one without a blog or active updates?

Read the full post on

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Quick Link: Social Media for Authors Like, Lurk, Linger

Quick links, bringing you great articles on writing from all over the web.

Over at Shelly Hitz, she discusses the different types of social media personalities you are likely to have. Or be. So are you a liker, a lurker, or a linger? Depending on the day and the site, I could be any of the three. I think that if you are lucky enough to get anyone to pay attention to you, well then that is pretty good.

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Social Media for Authors Like, Lurk, Linger

by Shelly Hitz

I have noticed that there are different types of personalities and different ways that people interact on Facebook.

When you’re on Facebook, do you like posts? Do you lurk? Or do you linger and engage with the people that you’re friends with?

As I observe patterns of people’s Facebook usage, I have found three ways how people interact in social media. Which one are you?

 The Liker

Some people just Like everything!

With Facebook, Like has developed a new meaning.

 

Read the full post on Shelly Hitz

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Quick Link: What Social Media Groups Are and How To Use Them

Quick links, bringing you great articles on writing from all over the web.

So you already know that you need social media to help spread the word about your titles, but have you heard of social media groups?  They are a great way to connect with people and help you stand out. Each social media platform has its own type of groups. Melissa Flickinger over at Bad Redhead Media helps you get started.

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What Social Media Groups Are and How to Use Them

By Melissa Flickinger

We discussed social media groups during our recent Twitter #BookMarketingChat. Of course, there is a lot to cover in one hour, so we chopped the list down to Facebook, LinkedIn, and Google+. We’ll discuss Pinterest, Goodreads, and other social media groups in future chats and my next post. Here are some key tips to get you started on social media groups.

If you have any social media accounts, chances are you’re already in several groups. But for those who are just getting their virtual foot in the social networking door, let’s explain what a social media group is and why they’re so great for building relationships!

What Are Social Media Groups?

Social media groups are general interest or niche-specific forums within social media platforms. Indie writers, paranormal romance book lovers, and author street teams are all examples of the different types of groups you might find on social media. These groups can be open or closed/secret, based on the owner’s (aka, moderator’s) preferences.

Read the full post on Bad Redhead Media

Quick Link: 6 Ways for Indie Authors to Use Goodreads to Network

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This post from on the Self Publishing Advice Center from ALLI has reminded me about how neglected my poor Goodreads page is.   Everyone talks about Facebook as the best for your dollar marketing tool, but Barb suggests you also give Goodreads a try. What do you think? Is Goodreads worth the time and effort or are you like me and neglecting it?

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6 Ways for Indie Authors to Use Goodreads to Network

Social media expert Barb Drozdowich counts the ways for indie authors to network on Goodreads to help market their self-published books.

 

Goodreads is often the site that is dismissed as difficult to navigate or full of nasty people.  Let’s talk about these elephants shall we?

  • Can Goodreads be difficult to navigate? I think so.  But like learning to write excellent dialogue,  navigating Goodreads can be learned with a little bit of patience.
  • Is Goodreads full of nasty people?  Not really.   There are 50 million account holders on Goodreads.  In a group that large there are bound to be nasty people.  Take your local mall as an example.  Not everybody there is pleasant,  yet you continue to shop there.  You develop a way to cope with the nasty people –  you can do the same on Goodreads.

The Enormous Potential Reach of Goodreads

Goodreads had 50 million readers all in on place. What could be a better place for finding readers, especially for the beginning author – or the author trying to make contacts in new countries, ?

But just like you would never stand in the middle of your local public library holding your book and yelling at everybody to read it,  that behavior is not acceptable on Goodreads either.  So put on your reader’s hat,  grab yourself a cup of coffee and think about six distinct networking possibilities.

Read the full post on Self Publishing Advice Center

Quick Link: Busy Authors Should Simplify Social Media Efforts

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Over at Romance University, new blogger Cecelia Mecca shares her tips on how to simply your social media to do list.

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Busy Authors Should Simplify Social Media Efforts by Cecelia Mecca

 Welcome first time poster Cecelia Mecca with her time saving ideas for any of us who might be busy. =) Like all of us!! Read on…

Busy Authors Should Simplify Social Media Efforts by Analyzing What Works and Focusing on the Intersection Between High Reach and Engagement

As marketing efforts for authors and other industry professional begin to look beyond reach to engagement, a shift in thinking about the purpose and management of social support for our content and campaigns is needed. Whether you’re launching a new book or building and sustaining interest in your own platform, engagement is key. It’s not enough any longer to set up a hashtag, analyze reach or impressions and consider a campaign successful. In addition, with content more prolific than ever, finding ways to cut through the noise is essential.

On the other hand, if you are not reaching your target audience, it is impossible to engage with them. Both are necessary metrics to consider. For example, your Facebook insights include both reach and engagement for a reason. Of course, you must regularly consider your insights in order to glean information from them.

If your reach is down on a given week, start by replicating your most popular posts. What trends do you see? What media type is doing well? What do posts which reached the audience have in common? Then shift to look at your engagement on those posts. Which had both high reach and engagement? Which posts did your audience engage with most? By looking at each metric together and individually, you can begin to replicate patterns since there really is only one golden rule when using social media to amplify your content. Find out what works and do more of it.

Quick Links: Author Blogs: 5 Bad Reasons for Authors to Blog and 5 Good Ones

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I LOVE this post by

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Author Blogs: 5 Bad Reasons for Authors to Blog and 5 Good Ones

By

5 Bad Reasons for Author Blogs

1) Getting Rich Quick

Nothing infuriates me more than those books and blogs promising writers they can make a gazillion dollars of “passive income” with a blog in the next month if they take this overpriced course or buy that book of rehashed advice from 2005.

The only people making a lot of “passive income” from blogging are the people selling the overpriced courses and worthless advice. Pyramid schemes always provide “passive income” for the people at the top of the pyramid. That’s not going to be you at this point. The boom is over.

Blogging is work. Writing is work. There’s nothing “passive” about it. Anybody who tells you otherwise is lying.

I used to subscribe to a couple of hype-y “how-to-blog” blogs, but I had to unsubscribe because these people are getting so desperate. One blogger now sends an email 15 minutes after you click through to read his post saying, “You’ve had enough time to read my post. Now share it to Facebook.”

Creepy!! I’d just shared his post to Twitter, but I deleted the Tweet and unsubscribed. You’re not the boss of me, dude. And I’m not responsible for your bad life choices. If you really were making the fortune you claimed to be making a decade ago, why didn’t you invest it?

Quick Links: Organic Marketing by Kristan Higgins

Quick links, bringing you great articles on writing from all over the web.

I love this post from Romance University! Marketing is a very important part of being an author. But you don’t want to turn into one of those people who everyone tries to avoid at a party because all they do is try and get you to buy their book. What is needed is organic marketing. What an awesome term!  You want to be you, genuinely you, but still find a way to get your message out. Read the post by Kristan Higgins to find out more.

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Organic Marketing by Kristan Higgins

Could you say “no” to this face?

I am so excited to welcome back one of my favorite authors, KRISTAN HIGGINS!

Please no, you’re saying. Not another article on marketing! I know, I know. They’re such a drag (except THIS one, of course). And we authors do so much already. We’re tired!

Don’t worry, my lambs. Organic marketing is different and in some respects, easier, because all it requires is authenticity, an eye for why your readers reach for your books and a little time.

What is organic marketing?

Organic marketing is what you do as an author when you’re not overtly promoting your books. Direct marketing is when I post a graphic on my Facebook page with a cover of my latest book and give all the buy links. When I do a Q&A on Goodreads. When my publisher takes out an ad in People and sends me on book tour.

Organic marketing is me being me…or rather, the me who writes my books. Believe it or not, I don’t share every little thing about myself, my family and my life. The fact that it seems like I do is because I understand organic marketing. I’ve been in the writing world for ten years, so I know by now what readers respond to in my books and in my public presence—social media, speeches, workshops. Sometimes (often) they’re funny —my awkward encounters with the UPS man, the time I ate dog biscuits by mistake. Sometimes they’re sad—a recent blog about when I lost a baby.

Quick Link: Using Twitter to Make Powerful Connections as a Creative Professional

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Today’s social media post is all about Twitter, a great way to connect to people 150 characters at a time. Posting at Jane Friedman, Daniel Parsons explains the best way for authors to use Twitter.

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Using Twitter to Make Powerful Connections as a Creative Professional

Today’s post is from Daniel Parsons (@DKParsonsWriter), author of The #ArtOfTwitter.

Finding an audience for your books can seem like an insurmountable task when you enter the publishing space with no prior experience. Thankfully, Twitter can help you become not only an engaged member of the community but—in time—an influencer with a loyal audience.

Four years ago, I joined Twitter because I was writing my first book, and every blog post on the internet seemed to be saying the same thing: authors need a social media presence. Starting out, I had one goal, and that was to get 3,000 engaged Twitter followers. Why 3,000? Well, I had heard that you only start to get interactions on every tweet when you hit that number, and publishers wanted authors with ready-made, interactive audiences.

A lot has changed in the last four years. For a start, I discovered self-publishing and decided that I preferred it to the traditional route. One thing that hasn’t changed, however, is my focus on Twitter. I now have 93,000+ followers, reach 500,000 people every month, and get over 200 interactions per day. My followers have helped me grab the attention of powerful influencers, got one of my stories 30,000 reads on the story-sharing site Wattpad, and landed me a job at a publishing house. Along the way, they’ve helped my tweets trend above those of A-list celebrities—beating the likes of Craig David and Ryan Seacrest in various hashtag games.