Tag Archives | what readers want

People Are Not Reading The e-Books They Buy Anymore

This post by Michael Kozlowski originally appeared on Good E Reader on 9/20/15. Are people reading the e-books they purchase from companies such as Amazon, Barnes and Noble or Kobo? There is growing research data that is supporting the notion that people are not reading the digital titles they buy online and for the most […]

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I Gave A Speech About Race To The Publishing Industry And No One Heard Me

This post by Mira Jacob originally appeared on Buzzfeed on 9/17/15. We are ready for a publishing industry that represents the world we live in, and it will ignore us — writers and readers of color — at its peril. Last night, I walked into a mini-disaster. Or to be more precise, I stood on […]

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Revenge of the Reviewed

This post by Aeryn Rudel originally appeared on Rejectomancy on 7/31/15. Note: strong language. You’ve passed the first hurdle, getting your work published, and now it’s out there in the wild, available at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and other purveyors of fine literature. You’ve made it. Rejection is a thing of the past, a bad […]

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Millennials 'Least Likely to Buy E-books'

This post by Charlotte Eyre originally appeared on The Bookseller on 6/24/15. Millennials are less likely to purchase e-books than any other age group, with 63% of 16-24 year-olds saying they have never bought one, according to a report from Deloitte. For its Media Consumer Report 2015, Deloitte surveyed 2,000 UK consumers about their media […]

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A Study of Reading Habits in the Age of Aquarius, or, The Novel as Time Machine

This post by Greg Olear originally appeared on The Weeklings on 3/4/15. i. IN MARCH OF 2011, I was on a panel with three other novelists at the Quais du Polar literary festival in Lyon, France. We were there, if memory serves, to talk about strong female protagonists in crime fiction, but the discussion wound […]

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The Delivered Story; The Interpreted Story

This post by David Baboulene originally appeared on his The Science of Story blog on 1/20/15. Whenever you absorb a story, you are actually experiencing *two* stories. Or at least, two versions of the same story. This is well accepted in academia, and was first documented by the Russian Formalists in the 1920s, (Victor Shlovsky, […]

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So What Do I Do Now?

This post by Wendy Lawton originally appeared on Books&Such on 2/10/15. How often do writers encounter a wrinkle of one sort or another and wonder, “So what do I do now?” When I was writing my very first middle grade book on an obscure figure from history I was shocked to find my character featured […]

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This Surprising Reading Level Analysis Will Change the Way You Write

This Surprising Reading Level Analysis Will Change the Way You Write

This article by Shane Snow originally appeared on Contently on 1/28/15. Ernest Hemingway is regarded as one of the world’s greatest writers. After running some nerdy reading level stats, I now respect him even more. The other day, a friend and I were talking about becoming better writers by looking at the “reading levels” of […]

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Music, Fiction, and the Value of Attention

This article by Nicholas Games originally appeared on The New Yorker on 1/27/15. The protagonist of Richard Powers’s 2014 novel, “Orfeo,” is a composer named Peter Els who, late in life, begins to dabble in biotechnology. Els’s attempts to “compose” in DNA turn him into a suspected bioterrorist fleeing across the country; one of his […]

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Is Reading a Right or a Privilege?

This post by Cathe Shubert originally appeared on Ploughshares on 1/27/15. After almost a year of protests by free speech advocates and famous authors, the UK’s Ministry of Justice is going to give prisoners the right to receive books in parcels from family, starting in February. Perhaps the most curious aspect of this case is […]

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Fired Old Man Angry at World, Ranting About Something or Other

This post by Ken Wheaton originally appeared on The Word O’ Wheaton on 1/18/15. Leon Wieseltier, recently run out of The New Republic as a gang of Silicon Valley nitwits took over and tried to fix it, has a piece in The New York Times Sunday Book Review that starts thusly: Amid the bacchanal of […]

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Science Fiction Romance – Caught Between A Rock And A Hard Place

This post by Greta van der Rol originally appeared on her blog on 1/20/15. Talking about what constitutes ‘romance’ seems to be a bit like climbing over the fence into the lions’ compound knowing they haven’t been fed for a while. But I have to say I find the debate a little bit perplexing when […]

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Amazon Offers All-You-Can-Eat Books. Authors Turn Up Noses.

This article by David Streitfeld originally appeared on The New York Times on 12/27/14. Authors are upset with Amazon. Again. For much of the last year, mainstream novelists were furious that Amazon was discouraging the sale of some titles in its confrontation with the publisher Hachette over e-books. Now self-published writers, who owe much of […]

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Finding Your Genre: An Epiphany

This post by Christa Allan originally appeared on Jamie Chavez’ site on 12/22/14. If you’re not from New Orleans and you find yourself plopped in the Big Easy one day, it’s likely one of the first questions you’ll hear is “Where did you go to school?” Here’s a “quirk alert” that will navigate you through […]

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The Making Of A Boxed Set

This post originally appeared on SFR Brigade on 11/13/14. Boxed sets are a popular commodity at the moment. You see them everywhere, collections of stories by a variety of authors, grouped under some unifying label. But there’s a lot of work involved in putting a set like this together. That’s why we thought we’d share […]

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