Tag Archives | how to write

Frustrated writer

Eight Myths New Writers Need To Stop Believing In

As General Manager for Windwalker Media and an independent author service provider, I keep seeing the same mistakes that derail new authors. Here are a few of the biggest ones that I have encountered, out of a lot of love and a little tongue in cheek. If I write it they will come/but my mommy […]

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Six Easy Tips for Self-Editing Your Fiction

This post by Kristen Lamb originally appeared on her blog on 8/21/13 but has some really good self-editing tips. There are a lot of hurdles to writing great fiction, which is why it’s always important to keep reading and writing. We only get better by DOING. Today we’re going to talk about some self-editing tips […]

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Image courtesy of National Novel Writing Month

How to Prepare for NaNoWriMo: To Outline or Not To Outline

This post by Brian A. Klems originally appeared on Writer’s Digest on 10/27/15. November is almost here, which means two things: 1) You’re going to be seeing a lot of mustaches and 2) it’s time to start preparing for National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo). Over the coming weeks, with the help of my friend and author […]

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Elizabeth Gilbert’s Top 10 Tips for Writers to Stay Inspired and Kick-Start Your Creativity

Editor’s note: Any NaNoWriMo’s out there? National Novel Writing Month, where you try and write 10,000 words in the month of November is almost here. So you may notice posts that are a little skewed towards NaNoWriMo success for the next few weeks. If you have any questions, helpful hints, or good articles, let me […]

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Getting Ready for NaNoWriMo

This post by Steve Shepard originally appeared on Storyist. “What are you writing this year?” It’s the question on everyone’s lips at the regional NaNoWriMo kickoff parties. The answer, even among seasoned NaNoWriMo veterans, is often “I don’t know.” So if you don’t know either, relax—you’re in good company. Heck, even Chris Baty, the NaNoWriMo […]

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The Consistency Of Your Voice

This post by Ksenia Anske originally appeared on her site on 9/29/15. You know that feeling you get when you read a fantastic book and it gives you shivers? When every page you turn makes you want to read more and more, and every sentence is so bloody good you want to read it twice […]

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Alfred Hitchcock's Bomb: Suspense, Surprise, and Emotion in Narrative

This post by Peter Ginna originally appeared on his Dr. Syntax blog on 9/21/10. Although I am a nonfiction publisher at the moment, I still love to read fiction in a variety of genres, from literary novels to thrillers. And I think for most editors it’s impossible to read a book without your editorial reflex […]

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Writing Begins With Forgiveness: Why One of the Most Common Pieces of Writing Advice Is Wrong

This post by Daniel José Older originally appeared on Seven Scribes on 9/9/15. Writing advice blogs say it. Your favorite writers say it. MFA programs say it. Write every single day. It’s one of the most common pieces of writing advice and it’s wildly off base. I get it: The idea is to stay on […]

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Raising Questions in Our Stories

This post by Elizabeth Spann Craig originally appeared on her site on 8/24/15. One thing that can trip up even experienced writers is giving everything away in the story too quickly. It’s always a temptation for me. I tend to want to reveal things too quickly in my story. I want to explain everything as […]

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Fueling the Muse—How to Mentally Prepare for “The Novel”

This post by Kristen Lamb originally appeared on her blog on 8/27/15. NaNoWriMo is kind of like Christmas for writers—suffering, drama, no sleep, heavy drinking and really bad eating habits. Also, we start talking about NaNoWriMo months before it actually happens. If you are a new writer and don’t know what NaNoWriMo is? It stands […]

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I Smell Your Rookie Moves, New Writers

This post by Chuck Wendig originally appeared on his terribleminds site on 8/26/15. Warning: strong language. I am occasionally in a place where I read work by new writers. Sometimes this is at cons or conferences. Sometimes it’s in the sample of work that’s free online or a fragment from a self-published work. Sometimes I […]

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S.A. Hunt: The Fine Art of Building People

This post by S.A. Hunt originally appeared as a guest post on Chuck Wendig’s terribleminds on 8/6/15. And now, a guest post by a fella named S.A. Hunt, who is a cracking author you probably aren’t reading. His newest is Malus Domestica — I just opened this book up the other day thinking I’d just […]

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How to Use the Passive Voice Correctly

This post by Kimberly Joki originally appeared on the Grammarly Blog. The passive voice is a misunderstood entity in the world of writing. It is unfairly judged by many authors. Some writers, without taking the time to get to know this grammatical structure, avoid it at all costs. Others use it ineffectively because they do […]

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What Personality Features Do Heroes And Psychopaths Have In Common?

This post by Scott McGreal originally appeared on Eye on Psych on 6/28/15. A recent research paper attempts to answer the question: “Are psychopaths and heroes twigs off the same branch?” Psychopathy is usually thought of as one of the most malevolent manifestations of a disturbed personality structure as it is associated with selfishness, callousness, […]

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Understanding the Flashback—Bending Time as a Literary Device

This post by Kristen Lamb originally appeared on her blog on 6/15/15. Last time we talked about flashbacks and why they ruin fiction. But, because this is a blog and I don’t want it to be 20,000 words long, I can’t address everything in one post. Today, we’re going to further unpack “the flashback.” I […]

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