Tag Archives | motivation

How Writing Makes People Smarter Supported By Science

This post by David K. William originally appeared on Lifehacker. We all knew this anyways, but it is nice to have your views supported by science! ~ * ~ Everyone should write—not just professional writers. You might say it’s easy for me to say that because I’m a writer. A singer can just as easily say, “Well, […]

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Elizabeth Gilbert’s Top 10 Tips for Writers to Stay Inspired and Kick-Start Your Creativity

Editor’s note: Any NaNoWriMo’s out there? National Novel Writing Month, where you try and write 10,000 words in the month of November is almost here. So you may notice posts that are a little skewed towards NaNoWriMo success for the next few weeks. If you have any questions, helpful hints, or good articles, let me […]

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Reality 301 With @heidicullinan

This post by Heidi Cullinan originally appeared on her blog on 5/15/13. Tonight Twitterverse roared with outrage over Kendall Grey’s post on Authors for Life where she bemoans the fact that sometimes, publishing is hard. Grey spent four years writing and a great deal of money and effort promoting an urban fantasy trilogy; it tanked. […]

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Getting Ready for NaNoWriMo

This post by Steve Shepard originally appeared on Storyist. “What are you writing this year?” It’s the question on everyone’s lips at the regional NaNoWriMo kickoff parties. The answer, even among seasoned NaNoWriMo veterans, is often “I don’t know.” So if you don’t know either, relax—you’re in good company. Heck, even Chris Baty, the NaNoWriMo […]

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Let Your Green-Eyed Monster Make You Insanely Successful

This post by Marcy McKay originally appeared on Bestseller Labs on 10/14/14. Every writer has experienced this emotion. When ‘it’ happens, your head explodes, rage swirls through you, while an imaginary fist pounds your gut. When? Why? It so happens that overnight, the internet has been buzzing with the latest literary whiz kid, who hit the […]

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Anatomy of A Query Rejection

This post by Kristin Nelson originally appeared on Pub Rants on 7/7/15. This June, I taught a query workshop at Lighthouse Writers Workshop’s Lit Fest. Afterward, one participant approached and asked me to read a response letter she had received (not from me). She wanted to know if it was a “standard” rejection letter. I […]

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Ask Polly: Should I Just Give Up on My Writing?

This post by Heather Havrilesky originally appeared on New York Magazine’s The Cut on 9/16/15. Dear Polly, I feel like you get lots of letters from folks either starting out pursuing their passion, or looking for a passion to begin with, but here I am, midlife, mid-career, full of passion but in a slump. I’m […]

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That’s Too Much: The Problem with Prolific Writers

This post by Drew Nellins Smith originally appeared on The Millions on 9/2/15. Lately I’ve been struck by the notion that there might be no books more lost than those buried in the overwhelming bibliographies of authors who have simply published too damn much. On Thursday, The New York Times published an op-ed defense of […]

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Virginia Woolf on Why She Became a Writer and the Shock-Receiving Capacity Necessary for Being an Artist

This post by Maria Popova originally appeared on Brain Pickings on 9/9/15. “Behind the cotton wool is hidden a pattern…the whole world is a work of art… there is no Shakespeare… no Beethoven…no God; we are the words; we are the music; we are the thing itself.” “Only art penetrates … the seeming realities of […]

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Writing Begins With Forgiveness: Why One of the Most Common Pieces of Writing Advice Is Wrong

This post by Daniel José Older originally appeared on Seven Scribes on 9/9/15. Writing advice blogs say it. Your favorite writers say it. MFA programs say it. Write every single day. It’s one of the most common pieces of writing advice and it’s wildly off base. I get it: The idea is to stay on […]

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Books Kept Me Alive In Prison

This post by Erwin James originally appeared on The Guardian on 8/31/15. The end of the ban on sending books to prisoners in the UK reminds me just how vital they were to my survival inside, and to the life I have lived since The official lifting on the ban on sending books to prisoners, […]

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Can Digital Community Support Writing, Really?

This post by Porter Anderson originally appeared on Futurebook on 8/7/15. Not unlike climate change, it’s something that digital-age writers worry about, but can’t nail down. I’m not sure what effect the accepting warmth of digital communities has on our literature. I don’t think encouraging people can make bad writing suddenly appeal to the masses. […]

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Homme de Plume: What I Learned Sending My Novel Out Under a Male Name

This post by Catherine Nichols originally appeared on Jezebel on 8/4/15. The plan made me feel dishonest and creepy, so it took me a long time to send my novel out under a man’s name. But each time I read a study about unconscious bias, I got a little closer to trying it. I set […]

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Rejectomancy In Words And Numbers

This post by Alan Baxter originally appeared on his Warrior Scribe site on 7/8/15. There’s been a lot of talk online lately about rejectomancy. For those who don’t know, rejectomancy is the dark art of turning rejection into motivation and positive reinforcement. It’s a kind of bloody-minded alchemy of will. As Kate Heartfield wrote for […]

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The Psychology of Writing and the Cognitive Science of the Perfect Daily Routine

This post by Maria Popova originally appeared on Brain Pickings on 8/25/14. How to sculpt an environment that optimizes creative flow and summons relevant knowledge from your long-term memory through the right retrieval cues. Reflecting on the ritualization of creativity, Bukowski famously scoffed that “air and light and time and space have nothing to do […]

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