Tag Archives | readers

Woman inside book.

Quick Links: 10 Things I Know About You and Your Books

Quick links, bringing you great articles on writing from all over the web. Jenny Hansen knows 10 things about you, and I have to admit she pretty much nailed me.  After reading Tolkien as a child, I spent many a day searching for Ents in the forest behind my house. Head on over to Writers […]

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A reader’s manifesto

Michael Tamblyn is c.e.o. of Kobo. This speech was originally delivered at the FutureBook Conference on 4th December 2015. The post was written on December 10, 2015 off TheBookSeller website, and answers the important question “What do readers want?” ~ * ~ Please read the full post on TheBookSeller website. ~ * ~ If you liked […]

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The Weird Agonies And Little-Known Science Of Wordnesia

This article by Matthew J.X. Malady originally appeared on Slate on 3/4/15. One hour and seven minutes into the decidedly hit-or-miss 1996 comedy Black Sheep, the wiseass sidekick character played by David Spade finds himself at an unusually pronounced loss for words. While riding in a car driven by Chris Farley’s character, he glances at a […]

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Is Reading a Right or a Privilege?

This post by Cathe Shubert originally appeared on Ploughshares on 1/27/15. After almost a year of protests by free speech advocates and famous authors, the UK’s Ministry of Justice is going to give prisoners the right to receive books in parcels from family, starting in February. Perhaps the most curious aspect of this case is […]

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More Verbal Abuse Among Young “50 Shades” Readers

This post by Andy Henion – Michigan State originally appeared on Futurity on 8/22/14. Young women who read Fifty Shades of Grey are more likely than others to show signs of eating disorders and have a verbally abusive partner, a new study suggests. Further, those who read all three books in the Fifty Shades erotic […]

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Literary Hangovers: Share Your Rude Awakenings From Fictional Reveries

This post by Alison Flood originally appeared on the Guardian Books Blog on 7/15/14. After a heavy bout of reading – or a bout of heavy reading – the return to reality can be painful. Tell us about your worst mornings after the book before. There are certain books I’ve finished and, looking up, have […]

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Here Be Digital Dragons: Lucid Writing Requires Mental Maps

This post by Douglas Carlson originally appeared on Brevity on 1/18/14. That slight tremor on August 15, 2013—which passed without much notice in the rest of the world—was the earth shifting at The Georgia Review. On that day we began accepting electronic submissions. On August 18th an essay came in online that caught my eye. […]

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7 Things the Most-Highlighted Kindle Passages Tell Us About American Readers

This post by Jospeh Stromberg originally appeared on Vox on 5/30/14. Conventionally, the most common way of gauging the most popular books in America has been looking at the New York Times’ bestsellers list. But as we shift from reading on paper to screens, there’s an interesting new option: Amazon’s lists of the most-highlighted passages and most-highlighted books […]

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Jane Austen Read Her Reviews… and Kept Notes on Them

This post by Sal Robinson originally appeared on the Melville House blog on 5/22/14. Some authors refuse to read their reviews. And then there’s Jane Austen. Who not only, it turns out, listened to what her friends and acquaintances had to say about her books, both positive and negative, but also took notes on it. […]

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Read, Kids, Read

This editorial by Frank Bruni originally appeared on The New York Times site on 5/12/14. As an uncle I’m inconsistent about too many things. Birthdays, for example. My nephew Mark had one on Sunday, and I didn’t remember — and send a text — until 10 p.m., by which point he was asleep. School productions, […]

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Thank Goodness For The Fairer Sex

This post by Michael W. Sherer originally appeared on The Crime Fiction Collective blog on 4/23/14. There are hundreds of reasons I love women, but one of the most important is how much smarter they are than men. (Unfortunately, too many women don’t give themselves credit for it, and more unfortunately most men will never […]

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Reading to Have Read

This post by Ian Bogost originally appeared on The Atlantic on 3/14/13. Spritz doesn’t strive to fix speed reading’s flaws, but to transcend reading entirely. If you’re a person who reads, you may have read about Spritz, a startup that hopes to “reimagine” reading. Like most tech startups, reimagining entails making more efficient. Spritz promises […]

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Does Reading Actually Change The Brain?

This article, by Carol Clark-Emory, originally appeared on Futurity.org on 12/23/13. After reading a novel, actual changes linger in the brain, at least for a few days, report researchers. Their findings, that reading a novel may cause changes in resting-state connectivity of the brain that persist, appear in the journal Brain Connectivity. “Stories shape our […]

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Creating A Discussion Guide For Your Book

This post, by Lisa Lickel, originally appeared on the AuthorCulture site on 12/9/13. Love em, Hate em, want them in the back of the book or not—discussion questions do add a new dimension to your work. I’ve had publishers tell me they don’t want them in the book, and know of some publishers that require […]

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Providing Rich Reading For Time Poor Readers

This post, by Martyn Daniels, originally appeared on the Brave New World blog on 10/23/13. How do we get people reading again or introduce them to reading? We have to accept that reading is different in that it stimulates thinking and imagery that is often served up on a plate with other media. After all, […]

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