The Double-Edged Sword of Self-Publishing

By Kat Meyer Originally published on The Bookish Dilettante Being the bookish dilettante that I am, I tend to wear many hats. There are ones—like this blog, that are frilly and fun and not very practical, and then there are the ones that pay the bills. Those hats are not necessarily flattering, but they do […]

Continue Reading
Examples of serif and sans serif letters

Which Are More Legible: Serif or Sans Serif Typefaces?

From Alex Poole’s Literature Review About this work Back in 1998 when Times New Roman was still widely used on the web, my then boss made sure we always designed our medical web sites with Arial, as she hated the look of serif fonts on the web. Was it the case that sans serif fonts […]

Continue Reading
logo_shadow-small-lo.jpg

Why I Decided To Form An Indie Press

I self-published my first novel, RealmShift, at the start of 2006 through Lulu.com. It was an interesting exercise. I learned a great deal about producing a quality book and I learned a lot about the nature of Recommended Retail Price, bookstore discounts, international postage and shipping costs and the stigma that stops people taking self-published […]

Continue Reading

Big Chain Bookstore Deathwatch

If you’re still focusing significant efforts on raising your visibility in Borders or Barnes & Noble, or if the difficulty of getting your self-published book into these chains is a major reason for your refusal to self-publish in the first place, the results of a Random House/Zogby Poll released May 29 will be a real […]

Continue Reading

Writing Contest Open to All

Writing contests are often great ways to get started for writers. The Society of Southwestern Authors (SSA) runs its Annual Writing Contest from January 01 through May 31 – this year, entries may be postmarked no later than June 1, 2009 as the 31st falls on a Sunday.

Continue Reading

What is Publishing 2.0 and why is it great news for writers?

Publishing 2.0 is changing the way books are written, published, sold and promoted over the internet utilising Web 2.0 technologies. Authors can now use these tools to self publish and get their message out there themselves. You do not need a publisher to write and sell your books, and you are not confined anymore by […]

Continue Reading

The rise of ebooks: IDPF reports sales up 108% in November

The IDPF on January 21 reported ebook sales were up 108% for the month of November, 2008 compared to the same period a year ago. The data is provided in conjunction with surveys conducted by the American Association of Publishers, and represent wholesale sales from only 13 US-based ebook publishers, so total reported sales figures […]

Continue Reading

Penguin Says Self-Publishing No Longer A Dirty Word

Excerpted from a NY Times Books article entitled “Self-Publishers Flourish as Writers Pay the Tab”: “Louise Burke, publisher of Pocket Books, said publishers now trawl for new material by looking at reader comments about self-published books sold online. Self-publishing, she said, is “no longer a dirty word.” ”

Continue Reading
<p>Once my novels became available on Amazon.com I ramped up the viral marketing on those Amazon pages in the hope of getting them to show up more often in book searches and hopefully sell more copies. If you want people to know your books are out there, you have to work hard to get them noticed. Probably the two most powerful tools on Amazon for making a book stand out are <strong>Tags</strong> and <strong>Listmania</strong> lists.</p>

Amazon Marketing Strategies – Tags and Lists

Once my novels became available on Amazon.com I ramped up the viral marketing on those Amazon pages in the hope of getting them to show up more often in book searches and hopefully sell more copies. If you want people to know your books are out there, you have to work hard to get them […]

Continue Reading
<p>The Amazon Associate program allows anyone with an Amazon account to display ads for Amazon products—like books, for instance—on their websites and earn a commission of 4 – 15% of the total sale anytime one of their site visitors clicks through one of the Amazon ads.</p>

If Your Book Is Listed On Amazon And You’re Not An Amazon Associate, You’re Throwing Money Away

The Amazon Associate program allows anyone with an Amazon account to display ads for Amazon products—like books, for instance—on their websites and earn a commission of 4 – 15% of the total sale anytime one of their site visitors clicks through one of the Amazon ads.

Continue Reading